Discombobulated

Discombobulated is a cool word, somewhat archaic, yet surprisingly current. At least for me. It explains how I’m feeling—confused, disoriented.

I’m trying to get back into the routine of blogging, visiting, and writing. For the last week I’ve been making the rounds of blogs (hi, friends!), and I’m working on a WIP. The latter has been going well. I’ve finished a short story I wrote for a murder-mystery anthology. Currently, I am in the clean up and trim phase. I need to cut 2,500 words and then share it with my critique partners. I’m excited about the story and it feels good to be focused on a project again.

On the home front, life is less settled. I live in Pennsylvania, where half of our state has reopened to the “yellow phase” of doing business. My county is not one of those and has been slated to reopen on June 4th.

The problem?

Many counties—mine included—have decided to defy our governor’s orders and reopen on May 15th. Things have gotten f-ugly with state vs. counties. To make matters worse, the industry in which I’m employed is governed by the state. Needless to say the whole thing is a mess and I am monitoring day-to-day press conferences as is my employer.

I am discombobulated.

Close up of cat, big gold eyes

Perhaps this explains why I have been reading the same book for over a week. That’s odd for me, especially given the book is fabulous. I’m glued every time I open my Kindle. Yet I find it hard to open my Kindle for my regular evening routine. I’ve been going to bed earlier than usual and sleeping like a log. Being discombobulated is not fun.

I hope it doesn’t last much longer.

white cat lying on back with head tilted back looking at camera

All of that aside, I pray you and your love ones are doing well. Whatever phase of craziness your state is in, look after yourself, your loved ones, and your neighbors. A few months ago, we would have never envisioned this reality but there is no escaping it. If my father were still living, today would be his 98th birthday. I don’t believe he could have ever conceived this in his lifetime. Until a few months ago, I wouldn’t have either.

If you’re discombobulated hold faith that it too will pass.


And if you have a moment while you’re roaming the blogosphere, my good friend Craig Boyack is hosting me today with a closer look at my short story, In Search of McDoogal. I am so discombobulated, I got my wires crossed and thought it was next week—which is why I don’t have a dedicated post directing readers there.

But Craig has rolled out the red carpet for me, and I’d love to send visitors to his blog. If you are not already following him, you’re missing out on entertaining content and a great author. You can find today’s post HERE. Race you to Craig’s place . . .

91 thoughts on “Discombobulated

  1. Mae, discombobulated is one of my favourite words and sums up exactly my current self as well! I’m glad your writing is coming along well and you are all safe in these most surreal of times. In our bubbles of home we can enjoy the warmth of family, fun of daily walks and ability (or lack of) to work … and just outside these borders a global tragedy. I fear the discombobulated state of being is here to stay a while. Keep well, my friend! Xx

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    • I fear discombobulation is going to be here for a while as well, Annika. I like the way you describe the “bubbles of home.” It’s true we can stay safe inside, but once we go out, it’s another world.

      The weather in my area has not been conducive to walking lately, but I have faith that will change with the weekend. Finally, some warm weather is headed our way. I can’t wait.

      It’s good to hear from you. Stay safe and well!

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  2. I’m definitely discombobulated, too. I like being around people, and all of this social distancing thing is weird. At the same time, I will do so accordingly because I don’t want any setbacks. Once is enough to go through this.

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    • I agree with you, Pete. We’ve been stuck inside this long. I fear if things move too soon there may be a setback, and the thought of that is decimating. Like you said, once is enough–more than enough!

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  3. Yes we’re discombobulated with Scotland and Wales continuing stricter rules than England and the Prime Minister’s rules for easing restrictions making no sense to anybody! My husband had a major operation just before we went into lock down so I am now a carer and shielder not going anywhere!

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    • Oh, Janet, I don’t blame you for not going anywhere. As carer and shielder for your husband you (and he) have to be extra careful. And wouldn’t it be great if all the powers-that-be who make the rules and restrictions were on the same page? Stay safe!

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    • It’s so scary, Jaye. Even as we look forward to getting back to normal, I fear the normal we knew is gone for good. Everything is going to be different from this point moving forward. I only hope and pray we can find a cure for this nasty virus. Stay safe!

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      • Florida is like PA – everybody wants to open – too soon. (ugh). I’m ostly sane, so far. I have things to do at home. I have no desire to go out more than I need to,until this thing settles into (whatever). Masks and social distancing is about 97% locally, so I’m not afraid to go out. We’ll see what happens when more opens up. Some May 1, more May 15, some more June 1.

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      • Hi, my friend! How great to hear from you and know that you are doing okay down there in the sunshine state. Masks and social distancing are also the norm in my area, which makes me feel better when I do go out. I’ve been working remotely from home, and we are finally getting some warm weather which is allowing walks outside so I’m adapting. Even so I am looking forward to June 4th when I can be out and about and return to my office. I miss the social interaction with others.
        Stay safe!

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  4. Sorry you’re feeling this way, Mae. I have to say that I’m the same way. Our United Kingdom is no longer united. We are now definitely split into Ireland, England, Scotland, and Wales. And I’m with the devolved nations; we don’t want to end lockdown too soon. I’m in the vulnerable group so will have to shield/isolate for a long time yet. The problem will really hit when hubby is faced with returning to work. At the moment, we are both isolating together. I can’t think about what will happen when that changes. And the way things are looking, that’s coming soon. I keep seeing all these protests, and can understand why, but I also see this virus largely leaving children alone (compared to adults) and would hate to see a world filled with orphaned kids if we don’t get a handle on this thing. … Okay, soap-box moment over, lol. Stay well and stay safe, everyone 🙂

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    • Harmony, you are more than entitled to a soap-box moment. I didn’t realize there was such division in the UK as far as moving ahead. I hope it all gets sorted out soon. And it’s scary that you’re going to have to address what will happen when your husband returns to work given you are in the vulnerable group. I know that has to be weighing on your mind on top of everything else. The whole situation is dreadful. I never thought I’d see a worldwide pandemic in my lifetime! Stay safe over there!

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the photos, Priscilla. You know how I am about kitties, LOL.

      I’ve trimmed a lot from my short already, but figure another 2500 should wrangle it into shape. Given the current state of affairs, the story has been a nice distraction!

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  5. Discombobulated is my normal state of being. I get it.

    I know your father is always in your heart and on your mind, and even more so today than usual. And I know the stress of the times is making it all harder for you. Offering prayers for peace, calm, and serenity. And safety. ❤

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    • Aww, thanks my friend. It’s hard to believe my father has been gone 45 years. Where the heck does time go?

      Wishing you peace, calm, and serenity, too. And, of course, safety. This thing can’t go on forever!

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  6. It is a crazy time for sure. I think, and this is just observational from my nightly “exercise” walks, that people are tired of hiding. They’ve crunched the numbers and see how low the %’s are, have stepped there toe over the line and nothing happened, don’t know anyone who has had it – and they are ready to live life again. And gov’t can’t win this no matter which way they go.

    On the plus side, I’ve gotten to know a lot more of my neighbors since they see me and my husband walking by every night. That’s nice ❤️ And discombobulated is one of my favorite words.

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    • Good for you, walking every night! I’ve been trying to get out whenever the weather cooperates, but we’ve had a dreadful May. Chilly, rainy, and windy. We’ve hit an all time record low and even had the dreaded white stuff last week. Only flurries, but it was the 2nd or 3rd time this month. That’s just so wrong!

      I’ve had two family members who had to be tested for COVID-19 due to possible exposure, but thankfully, both tests were negative. I can’t wait to be out and about again, but when I do I’ll do it wisely with mask and gloves and plenty of social distancing!

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  7. We are opening up slowly, but there are still new cases being reported. I hate this! I hate that the virus has invaded our world. And If I never heard the terms social distancing, stay at home, quarantine, COVID, or isolation again, it would be too soon. But it’s a way of life these days. I’m tired of the negative news media and all the fake news on social media.

    And I LOVE the word discombobulated. I think all of us are feeling that now.

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    • I think your first paragraph says it all, Joan. You’ve summed up exactly how I feel.I think everyone is just so disgusted with this nasty virus. And to think it may resurface in a few short months come fall, makes me want to flee screaming. Hopefully, we will have a cure for it soon.

      I’m glad you like “discombobulated.” It’s a cool word, and it fits 🙂

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      • My husband uses it frequently. And BTW, I forgot to mention your father. I know you were close to him. My own father would be shocked at what’s going on in our world.

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    • Hi, Jay. Thanks for stopping by to say hello. Even though I’m discombobulated, I’m slowly returning to the world of blogging. I’ve been offline for weeks and have missed everyone. Hope you are well. Stay safe and have a great day!

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  8. Discombobulated is a perfect word to describe so many things right now. I didn’t realize things were so f-ugly in your neck of the woods – as if things weren’t stressful enough already. Hang in there, Mae!

    On a lighter note, I thought about you when I was at Sam’s Club last week. You’d mentioned toilet paper was a rarity on shelves where you live, and Sam’s had several full pallets of it in front of the checkout lanes. That’s a sight I hadn’t seen in a while, lol. Sending good thoughts your way!

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    • Seriously? Several full pallets of TP? Woohoo! That could be a sign of a turning point. Hubby and I actually scored a pack (6 rolls) at our drug store last week. Still haven’t seen a single role in my grocery story, and that’s been since mid March. Insanity!!

      And, yeah, things are f-ugly right now. The whole mess needs to resolve itself soon. Stay safe, Teri!

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  9. I know two people who caught it and beat it at home, and they said it was miserable, and my doctor lost two people in her family to it. My daughter’s a nurse near Indy and sees patients everyday, so I take it seriously. I can understand the worry of people who have run out of money, though, and can’t pay bills or put food on the table. What I can’t understand are the people who are just bored and don’t care if they spread it. My sister’s on oxygen 24/7, though, so we probably think about it more than some people. She wouldn’t survive it. But the numbers seem to be getting a little better and hopefully soon, we can get out and about again. I just really hope it doesn’t return in the fall, but that sounds possible.
    And yay that you’re fine-tuning your story! What’s next after that?

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    • Oh, your poor doctor. I can’t imagine how hard it must be to lose someone to this dreaded disease. I’m glad the two people you know were able to beat it. I’ve also heard if you catch it, it’s miserable. Two of my family members were tested, but,thankfully, both tests were negative. I’m sure your sister is concerned and fearful. I pray she stays healthy and well, and that this wretched thing doesn’t return in the fall.

      And after I finish my short, I need to get back to my WIP. Maybe I’ll actually be able to focus on it, since the writing bug has resurfaced 🙂

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  10. You said it all with your post title today, Mae. Discombobulated is exactly how I’ve felt for the nearly 12 weeks I’ve been at home, unable to focus on even the things I LOVE, like writing. I did manage to find some escape from stuff I don’t have the power to change through reading, though, and have devoured several fantasy series in a desperate attempt to avoid reality for a few hours here and there.

    I do know that this, too, shall pass. But what damage will it have left behind? And how many people will the world have lost? Those questions are more than I can wrap my mind around, so I’ve started working on the things I do have control over (so far). My attitude, my stress levels, my house and garden, and mostly, my writing. I’m back to work on my WIP, and I find it is helping me cope better than anything else I’ve done. I’m working on remembering how to smile, too.

    Reacquainting myself with gratitude is helpful, as well. Every day, I try to remind myself that I’m still here. I’m still well and have another day in front of me in which to try to do it all better. Keeping that in mind helps me accept that I can’t change the world, but I can change myself for as long as I’m a part of it. And that’s what I aim to do. Be the best me I can be as it all plays out.

    Congrats on getting your story finished and good luck with the discombobulation, my Penderpal. 🙂 ❤

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    • You have a wonderful outlook, Marcia, focusing on those things that you’re grateful for. I also think having distractions like your garden, the house, and writing are so helpful. We need distractions more than ever now. You’ve self-isolated longer than I have and I know how fidgety I have gotten. I was doing a ton of reading previously, but now I’ve slowed down with my current book. That, of course, is going to change because a certain PenderPal is trying to suck me into a new fan club 🙂 I’m going to get busy reading! Stay safe! ❤

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      • Yay! I’m so excited about you reading the rest of The Dresden Files while I re-read along with you. It’s going to be fun!! And lord knows, we need all of that we can get right now. As for my outlook, I sort of misplaced it for a few weeks, but I think I’m on track again, now. It’s the same way I feel about growing older, in general. No point in bemoaning the things you can no longer do. It’s much better to think about all the stuff you can still do. And then DO it. 😀 That’s my goal.

        And now, I’m going to attempt to get a few more words written on The Emissary 3, if possible. Wish me luck, and I’ll send the same your way, as well. 😀 ❤

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  11. Agreed with everything, including the word. My California governor says one thing and does another which only makes any sort of organized opening even more, well, discombobulated.

    Loved your book so I will drop by and see what’s going on at Chris’.

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    • So glad you enjoyed McDoogal, Jacqui 🙂

      I know we have to look to our elected officials through this mess, and I do realize they’re dealing with something entirely new, but when they can’t agree themselves–or say one thing and do something else–it’s especially trying. Hang in there, and stay safe. Hopefully, in a short time, the worst of this will be behind us!

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  12. I love this word, Mae and think you found the perfect way to describe how this is making us feel. It’s the same here the counties are fighting the state. I was surprised when a really good person and pastor said I think this virus stuff is fake. My husband spoke up saying a friend from school just went on a ventilator from it. I point out its the whole world and get confused looks back. I’m puzzled. I have been trying to write a short story but I keep going to everyone has to die…so, I may stick to poetry for a while. Thanks for finding the word to describe the feeling from this craziness. Sending hugs.

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    • Hi, Denise.That is DREADFUL what that pastor said. So many people have died, and so many others are fighting for their lives. I hope he rethinks his stance. Every time I stop and think it’s the whole world, I feel…well, discombobulated, like I’m in a sci-fi movie. I know you can relate. And I didn’t realize you were in the same situation with counties fighting the state. It’s so tiring, especially when people’s lives and livelihoods are caught in the middle.

      Poetry is a great way to express yourself. When you’re ready, writing the short story will still be there. Stay safe, my friend. Hugs back at you!

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  13. Great word, Mae. The sad thing is people are protesting to open up their communities yet once open most (60% are continuing to isolate) I have to respect your confusion when organized businesses cannot get sold information on how to handle things and still be inside the law. Our mayor wants masks in place but will not enforce violations. “People will die if they don’t wear masks is his articulated incentive to do so.” Crazy stuff. I’m heading over to Craig’s.

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    • Hi, John. I do think when counties reopen, we will have the same results here, with many people continuing to self-isolate. I know that I WANT to go out, but when I do it will be with a mask and gloves and lots of social distancing. I don’t understand why so many people are against wearing masks. It’s selfish, given they chance infecting others. So, so sad. And like you said—crazy stuff.

      Safe safe and see you at Craig’s place!

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  14. At least you’re sleeping well. I mean, honestly. I’m a lousy sleeper. I understand the distress you’re dealing with, and the uncertainty, but to sleep well, to me, is a gift! Something to be grateful for there.
    And also, kittiiiiiiieeeessss!!!! 🙂 🙂

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    • Heheee, I’m glad you like the kitty photos 🙂 🙂

      I do admit I am sleeping well. It’s kind of like an exhaustion. I feel for those who don’t sleep well, especially now. At least those hours at night are a time to refresh. Here’s hoping you get some good sleep. Stay safe and well!

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  15. Discombobulated is the perfect word for this crazy time! Things are turned upside down and chaotic almost everywhere. I don’t know if you’ve heard the Texas salon owner drama, but a woman defied the Governor’s order to keep her business closed, so they arrested her and put her in jail. The judge confined her to seven days in jail and a huge fine. Then the Attorney General’s office bailed her out of jail and ordered the judge to rescind the sentence. Just crazy! Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Mae. I’ve visited Craig’s post. Hang in there!!

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    • Jan, I heard something about the salon owner on the news, but didn’t realize the woman had been jailed. And then to have the AG bail her out and reverse everything?!?! What a waste of effort and time. Here, most lawmakers have said they will not fine business owners who defy orders and open prior to deadline. Nobody wants to tread that line. I do feel for these people. I have a family member who owns a nail salon. Even when PA goes to the “yellow phase” she will not be permitted to open. Hair salons, nail salons, gyms, spas, movie theaters–they all have to wait for the green phase and there is no telling when that will be. Hopefully, all this discombobulation will end soon. Stay safe and thanks for visiting with me at Craig’s place too.

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  16. If discombobulated makes us sleep well… that clearly states we are coping well with these terrible times. Everyday when I wake up in the morning, the first thought that hits me is: “This too shall pass.” Certain things are beyond our imagination! I wonder how you came upon this terrific word.

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    • Balroop that saying “this too shall pass” is one I have treasured for decades and I often rely on it in times of trouble. There’s also a verse from the Psalms, 46:10 that I fall back on–“Be still and know that I am God.” Both tell me whatever is happening will not endure forever.

      I have always slept well for the most part, but now I think it is exhaustion that plagues me at night. That aside, I’d still rather sleep well than not.

      And I’m glad you liked the word I chose to describe what I’m feeling 🙂

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  17. I like discombobulated a lot more than unprecedented times 😦
    It’s as though the whole world has turned upside down and is having a last laugh at our expense.
    Happy birthday to your dad in Heaven, Mae {{hugs}}

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    • Aww, you are so sweet to send birthday wishes to my dad in Heaven. Thank you, Jacquie! ❤

      It does feel as though the world has turned upside down. These are such crazy times. I sometimes think what my young grandnieces and grandnephews will be telling their children about it when they're older.

      Stay safe, my friend!

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    • Hi, Stanalei. How wonderful to see you!
      Thanks for dropping by to say hello and for rooting that my phases will soon be in sync. I hope you and your family are well. Stay safe, and have a great day!

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  18. You are far from alone. This whole situation is surreal and there are no rules anymore. I’ve never seen anything like this (politically or socially) before. The best/only thing to do is to make sure that YOU are safe – healthy – doing what you need to do, regardless of how others are treating this situation. We’re here for you! 🙂

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    • Hi, Sue. It’s so great to hear from you! I have been offline for ages and this is only my second “emerging back into the blogosphere” post. It’s hard readjusting, but I also love seeing my friends. It’s scary that we’re all in this together, but great that we can reach out to each other. Thanks for the wonderful words of support. They are much appreciated. I pray you and yours are safe!

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  19. Great word. MC. What I dislike about being quarantined is that virtually all meetings are now on Zoom or just the phone. I don’t find it very satisfying. We are in phase one of opening up, which is virtually indistinguishable from being quarantined. Just more people in the grocery store. I’m thinking June before restaurants are open, and my husband is not keen about that. Yes, I am discombobulated and it’s making me peckish!

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    • I think our “yellow phase” will be like your phase one, Noelle, with not a whole lot of difference than being on lockdown. I so want to move ahead and get back to normal, but every time I listen to the news (and all the new cases that are creeping up, including in Wuhan), I start to freak. I’m so thankful we can reach out and support each other. Stay safe, and let’s pray this doesn’t last much longer.

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  20. An apt word to describe the crazy world we now find ourselves in. The Post Traumatic Stress Disorder that will follow will be of a magnitude never before experienced. We are now caretakers of a world forever changed. Accepting that nothing we once understood to be truths will remain the same will be a difficult and harrowing journey. I have faith that those of us that live through it will find the strength and focus to lead the way out of the darkness and chart a course for the light. Hugs and warmest wishes. Stay safe, my dear friend.

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    • You made an excellent point about PTSD, Soooz. I never stopped to consider it, but you are so right that many will be affected by these times and will have a hard time recovering. As you said, difficult times and a harrowing journey. Like you, I have faith that we will live through this and come through the darkness into the light. Your words and your faith are uplifting. Thank you for sharing my dear friend. Hugs to you ❤

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  21. Only a writer would use such a fun word to allocate to such a troubled time and disturbed sense of being. My writerly skills must be slipped – instead of discombobulated, I’ve been saying “I feel like crap”… not very eloquent, but in essence, much the same as discombobulated! For me (an INFJ) the UNKNOWN of this whole Covid situation is what’s doing my head it. While things were normal (KNOWN) I was fine. During the systematic lockdown and closure of things I was discombobulated for a couple of weeks. Then when lockdown became the new norm, I was fine again. Now, coming out the other side that discombob is back. I suspect – being a fellow INFJ – that’s what’s doing it for you too Mae. Be very kind to yourself at the moment. Go with your gut and do whatever makes you feel less discombobbed, even if that’s sitting back on the sofa watching eye-rot – TV – for a few hours. Take care!

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    • Jess, I am so with you on exactly what you said—it’s the unknown that is so difficult and scary and sapping the energy out of me. Once I adjust and there is “know” it’s like treading water. Okay, got this, I can function. Then a unknown surfaces and it feels like sinking again.

      Our weather has been dismal and cold lately too and that isn’t helping. Fortunately, sunshine and warmer temperatures are moving in so I think that will help lift spirits for everyone. I know you are moving into your winter so I imagine things are even harder for you.

      Stay safe, enjoy some eye rot and a few books. Whatever helps you through! 🙂

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      • Luckily we’ve had a stunning autumn (fall) so the Covid ‘gloom’ hasn’t seemed so awful. I AM worried about what the added isolation of winter will do to people’s already stretched mental health. Maybe just in time, though, our first restrictions are beginning to ease. There’s light at the end of this tunnel!

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  22. Dear Clair, great word and I think it sums up exactly how most of the world is feeling at the moment. I live in Spain, so you can imagine how we are. We’ve been in lockdown for two months now, and although we’ve started to deescalate, this is not going to be a smooth and regular process, and we’re still stuck in phase zero here in Barcelona, we don’t know how long for. We’ve only recently been allowed out for walks or exercise, so it’s anybody’s guess. My reading is picking up slowly, but writing… Take care and thanks for keeping us up-to-date.

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    • HI, Olga. I feel for you being stuck at phase zero and only recently allowed to go for walks and exercise. After two months? We are quickly coming up on that same time period but have had more freedoms. I’ve been able to take walks behind my house (there is a church with a private lane that makes for a perfect walking area), and we’ve managed several trips to the grocery store. Reading is a good distraction during this time, but I do think writing is hard for all of us. It’s difficult to be creative when you’re at low ebb.
      Take care of yourself and thanks for checking in. Stay safe!

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  23. There’s alot of that going around, and justifiably so. You needed that sleep. I have not been sleeping well, and it can be so draining. I hope the ruckus in your state eases. I’m sure you will keep the faith, even in this time of being sorely tested.

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    • Yes, absolutely, I will! It’s all I can do because the rest is out of my hands.
      I hope you start sleeping better, Flossie. Last night was a very restless one for me, but that’s unusual of late. Getting enough sleep definitely impacts how we face each day. Take care, my friend, and stay safe!

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    • Hi, Kim. I do think most everyone is discombobulated right now (interesting that you’ve used that to describe yourself for a long time. I’ve always been a bit out of step with the world, so I guess I could, too). I’m hoping things start to settle down in PA. For me, it’s been decided that I won’t be returning to work until June 4th when my employer will reopen. My industry (real estate) is governed by the state so there is little else we can do. I believe PA is the only state in the nation where real estate agencies aren’t permitted to operate, even with safety guidelines.

      Stay safe. I’m doing my best to adjust to this new normal.

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  24. I may have used discombobulated a few times. It’s a great word. I work at an essential business and have been going to the office every day. I hate seeing people in masks, getting our temperatures taken, closing our doors to the public, and all the rest of the crap that is going on.

    My son-in-law graduates from medical school at the end of June and they have canceled the graduation. We had planned to go, but I would need a month of vacation to make the trip. Once you get to his part of the state, there is a mandatory fourteen day quarantine. That’s insane. We made the difficult decision to stay home. The cancellation of the ceremony made that decision a little easier. But not visiting means no seeing the grandchildren either. So much has been affected by this microscopic germ.

    I think this has some affect on everyone. I have less desire to do anything after work. I get home, make dinner, and sit down watching the news. Hoping for something good, but seeing the same doom and gloom.

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    • I’m so sorry about your son-in-law’s graduation and also that you won’t get to see the grandkids. I keep thinking this can’t stretch on much longer, and I worry that if it does we (the populace) will become careless with preventative measures, just because everyone is so tired of the whole thing.

      My sister works for an essential business and has been doing the same thing as you with going to work each day. It’s just how she manages there that has changed, as I know it has for you as well–with masks and gloves and social distancing, wiping surfaces down, etc.

      I’ve started limiting myself to how much news I watch each day, because the doom and gloom becomes to much to take. Hang in there, Michele. Sending positive thoughts your way!

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    • Thanks, Mark! I think I must be getting used to being discombobulated given I managed to finish the short story. It did feel good to be writing again. Now if I can just stay on track, LOL. Take care and stay safe!

      Liked by 1 person

  25. I’ve been using “disoriented” but should upgrade to “discombobulated.” Good word, Mae. I’ve been watching the stats and PA is suffering big time. I can’t believe people are trying to open. I get it, but honestly, this virus is killing people. But worrying accomplishes little other than to keep us awake at night. I’m glad you’re writing. Breathe, stay in the present, and stay safe. This pandemic will eventually pass.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Diana! It’s great to have you drop by. I guess we are all in this disoriented/discombobulated situation. A few more of our counties have been given the okay to move to the yellow phase next week. I’m hoping mine will be bumped up to an earlier open date too, but I agree that we need to stay safe. I keep hearing of small businesses opening for business, but then I’ve talked to other business owners who are unwilling to risk it. Lives are at stake.

      As you said, this pandemic will pass eventually. In the meantime, stay safe and well. I wish you happy writing! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Great word, Mae, and pretty much sums up how I feel. I stay anxious most of the time and either sleep a lot or wake up after a few hours and can’t go back to sleep. Life isn’t that much different for my immediate family, but hearing about everything else going on around the country is disconcerting. Our state has started opening up slowly although there are more cases now than there were on lockdown.

    We moved into Phase 2 of reopening yesterday, but so many people are impatient and aren’t adhering to the guidelines as they should. I don’t go out but my husband does when we need groceries or something. So many have “the government can’t tell me what to do” mentality, and I just can’t shake the feeling that we’re still moving too fast and opening everything back up too soon. I hope I’m wrong.

    Stay safe.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Kim. It’s definitely a scary world. So many changes too, all tangled up with learning to adapt and function in this new way of life.
      I’m so sorry you’re having trouble sleeping. It’s understandable why so many are anxious, especially with the constant barrage from news outlets reminding us about issues daily. Like you, I’m saddened by those with “the government can’t tell me what to do” mentality and just pray that we aren’t moving too fast. Stay safe. Right now the grocery store is the highlight of my getting out time too!

      Liked by 1 person

  27. It is rather a strange thing really, Mae, that we are all so shocked about this virus. Pandemics and huge death rates have always been a part of our world if we look back in history, so we shouldn’t be so surprised this has happened. I think humans have controlled everything on this planet for most of the current populations lifetimes and we’ve had antibiotics and medications which have made us a bit disdainful of the power of nature. We are all learning a horrible lesson now. My country is also in a mess. We locked down way to early and now the lock down must be lifted and businesses continue or our whole economy will fail. We already have millions of people virtually starving and surviving on food parcels which are not being timeously delivered. Now, the government is reopening schools on 1 June and our infection rate has tripled in the past two weeks and so has the death rate [although nothing compared to the US death rate]. It just doesn’t make any sense at all.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Robbie, that is awful about the death rate tripling. With that in mind, it’s very scary they are opening schools so soon. In my lifetime, I have never seen anything like this pandemic. I think that’s what makes it so scary for so many. Even my 80-year old aunt has said she has never witnessed anything this global or this destructive. I think of the Influenza pandemic of 1918 and think that we may be feeling what those people did in their day. I just pray that it will end soon.
      Take care and stay safe!

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Wow. I knew I was behind, but I didn’t realize a whole month behind! Yeesh. And that is a perfect word for how things feel. And things still feel discombobulated, now that the slow reopening (with cheaters on Memorial Day weekend, I’m sure) is also leading new infection numbers.

    Stay safe, Mae! And like Betsy said, cat therapy is a great way to find a little bit of serenity. Zoey says ‘Hi!’ to Raven!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Julie, I’m honored you’re even trying to catch up with my old posts, but you don’t need to. I know how much we all have to juggle. I didn’t even try to go back through posts I had missed. Far too many!!

      Yeah, the rise in new cases is very scary. I’ve heard Arizona is now out of ICU beds. My county in Pennsylvania is still in the “yellow” phase. One of the last counties in my state. Most of those that aren’t green yet, will go green tomorrow. Meanwhile, my area is still adhering to yellow guidelines.

      Cat therapy—along with book therapy—sounds like a solution I can get onboard with to pass the days! Raven sends kitty meows to Zoey! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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