Is this what it’s come to?

angry cat hissingI’m ticked right now. See the cat on the right? That was me a few nights ago.

Let me explain.

Lately, there’s a trend for authors to band together and offer free ebooks in a mass giveaway. There’s nothing wrong with that. I’ve even participated in the past. Authors get to collect email addresses for newsletters—hoping to convert the reader into a fan—and readers get to discover books they may not have chosen otherwise.

Normally, when I see a group giveaway, I’ll scan through the titles and see if anything interests me. I’ve stopped downloading books simply because they’re free, and only download if I intend to read them. My Kindle is overflowing as it is, so a lot of times, I leave these giveaways without opting to download a single title.

Recently, however, a particular book caught my eye. It’s one I had been considering for a while, and since it was being offered through an Instafreebie giveaway, I thought why not? I hopped over, provided my email address, and downloaded my free book.

Great, right?

I thought so too until I reached the end of Chapter 6 and this message appeared:  If you enjoyed this preview, I hope you’ll check out the full book on Amazon!

Huh?

Nothing like being six chapters into a novel and realizing the free “book” you downloaded was only a preview.

Here’s how it’s supposed to work:
Author offers free ebook.
Reader provides email address to the author in exchange for the book.

Simple, right?

I held up my end of the deal by providing my email, but did not get the free book I was promised in return. How does that make me feel?

Cheated.

Striped kitty looking at camera and making funny face. Words "where's the rest?" above

Worse, the author lost an opportunity for a new reader. I was enjoying the story, but suddenly—no more book. At that point, it was 10 o’clock at night and I was on my Kindle Paperwhite which doesn’t allow me to make purchases. I would have had to add the book to my wish list, then hop on my iPhone or computer to finish the purchase. Not likely given how irked I felt.

I started reading something else and don’t know that I will ever get back to the original book again. The author had just released the second book in the series so it made sense to do an Instafreebie–except it wasn’t. There are several book series I faithfully follow that initially hooked me through a free ebook. In this case, I’m sure I would have finished the first book and bought the second, likely becoming a long time fan.

That’s all down the drain given the avenue this author chose to take.

Is this the new trend, or did I miss something in the fine print? As authors we value the readers who provide their email addresses and sign up for our newsletters. There is a certain level of trust that’s expected when a reader volunteers that information. I hope what happened to me was a goof and not something most authors will practice going forward. If you promise a free book, deliver a free book. It should be simple.

Right?

90 thoughts on “Is this what it’s come to?

  1. I have not run into this yet…seems sneaky.
    I agree only downloading books now I want to read…even if free. You have some great cat pics though…so something good came out of it:)

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Grrr…I sense your frustration, Mae!! Understandably so and would feel the same. Before I’ve been reading only a sample I donwloaded and then came to the words…do you want to buy to continue. I don’t mind that…it was just I’d forgotten and it’s late at night when I just want to cosy up and read!!! Great pics to portray your annoyance! Happy Reading…something else! 😀📚

    Liked by 2 people

    • That’s exactly how I felt, Annika. I just wanted to cozy up and read. The shame of it was, the book was good and seemed promising. It was so discouraging to realize it was only a preview, but I wasn’t going Amazon shopping at that point.
      Fortunately I had a ton of other books on my Kindle to choose from.

      Glad you liked the photos 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Glad to help! Although in this case, I think it may have been the author’s choice as the book was one of many in an advertised giveaway. I always thought Instafreebie was devoted to books–in their entirety–but sites often change as they grow. The next I will be more careful in what I choose!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I don’t suppose you could take part in our book tour on January 12th? The book is Lazy Days, the true story of our first family holiday 40 years ago. (All material is supplied)

        Liked by 1 person

      • I would be happy to participate in your tour! I loved Anita’s Let it Go (my 5-star review is on Amazon US and Amazon UK) and I have already purchased Secrets. I also want to pick up the first of Jaye’s murder mystery series too. Send me what you have for the tour and it would be my pleasure to host you. I think you have my email but if not, it’s maeclair (at) maeclair (dot) com.

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      • As an author, I’ve never used Instafreebie before. Most of my books are through a publishing house so it limits me in what I can do. If you’re in KDP, I don’t think you can offer it as a whole book in Instafreebie, unless you would coordinate that with your free days at KDP. Linda Mims left a lot of comments on this post about Instafreebie and Amazon. Maybe some of those will help?

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      • Also, have to say as authors, the way you’re doing things works. Anita offered a free book. I took advantage of it. Read it, loved it, became a fan, and bought another of her books. That’s exactly how a good freebie works. Thanks!

        Like

  3. I’m with Craig. That’s a bad business practice. In essence, you’ve entered into a contract. The author provides a book, you provide contact information. You held up your end; the author did not. That’s bad faith, and the author needs to know about it. So does everybody else.

    If the author wanted to provide a sample only, it should have been stated clearly. Or, as is common practice these days, put the first few chapters in the backmatter of another release. Then it could have worked to his or her favor rather than alienating readers.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Exactly. Also, if I want a preview, I can read that on Amazon. Maybe the preview wouldn’t be 6 chapters long but it would be enough for me to decide whether or not I wanted to purchase the book.

      I looked at it as a contract to. If you’re going to harvest email addresses, making sure you hold up your end of the deal.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. *Tuts…* I’m really wary about any sort of giveaway through the megastores, although I love a bargain of course! I’m happier getting a discounted price rather than ‘free’ precisely for the reason you’ve just fallen foul of Mae. 😦
    I don’t think it’s necessarily even the author’s fault for the misrepresentation – the wizards for setting up countdowns etc can get very confusing at times (or maybe it’s my advancing age…). I guess I just have a curmudgeonly attitude along the lines of ‘never look a gift horse’. That, and not liking to devalue myself and my work, although I appreciate that loss leaders can really help boost sales. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m not that familiar with Instafreebie, Jan, but I had heard good things about the site and I know a lot of authors use it. Given that, I would have thought the promo was exactly as it appeared. I’m still uncertain if the author made this decision but it’s definitely not the way to build a fan base. As I said in the post, I’ve bought both a 5 and 9 book series from stumbling over the first book in a freebie giveaway. I think these things can work to an author’s advantage if used correctly. This clearly wasn’t the way!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Certainly, something for every author to ponder long and hard, Mae 🙂 Any sort of giveaway should be exactly what it says on the tin, else it makes you look really bad! 😦

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I’ve noticed that on Instafreebie of late! They are now offering “book previews” instead of the full book. I don’t like the practice, either, and haven’t even clicked to check them out — for the same reason. If i want a free preview, I’ll download it at the book retailer. But if you’re going to add me to your mailing list, I want to know I’m going to be glad to hear from you. That means reading the whole thing. (Now, from an author’s standpoint, I get it, but to me, it feels almost like bait and switch.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Susan. Thanks for popping into add your thoughts. I had no idea Instafreebie was starting book previews. Ugh! I guess that’s fine as long as they’re clearly defined as previews. In this case, the book was part of an advertised group giveaway. You’re right–bait and switch. I’m also with you that if I want a preview, I’ll grab that from a book retailer. It’s so sad to think authors need to go this route to collect emails!

      Like

  6. I agree with Staci. If it wasn’t going to be an actual free “BOOK,” as in beginning, middle, and END, it should have been stated clearly in the offer. And not even hiding that little tidbit in the small print would make me happy. Right up front, where there’s no mistaking what you are downloading. Free, or not, “a book” means the whole shebang, and like you, I would have been very upset. Plus, like Craig, I would probably never read that author again.

    When an author breaks my trust, via a gimmick like this, or a plot device that I feel is a slap in the face, I draw a line through their name, and I don’t buy their books any longer. I have a few other things that will get me to cross an author off my reading lists, too, but I won’t go into them here. Its’ just that I think as an author, you owe something to the readers who support you, and you should always try to be the writer they expect you to be. (Unless, of course, you don’t care about sales and a loyal fan base.)

    Liked by 2 people

    • A loyal fan base is what it’s all about. The sad part is I probably would have become a fan of this author. They had a great writing style, and the book was interesting. Unfortunately, the experience left a bad taste in my mouth so I seriously doubt I will be reading anything else by this author. Like you, there are certain things that make me cross an author off my reading list, and this is one of them!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I am so NOT a fan of book “previews.” Some believe them to be great marketing tools, but for me, they’re just a ripoff. Post excerpts on your blog or in your newsletter…or not.

    Scan Instafreebie and you’ll find several multi-author promos which are all previews only. Meh. 😕😕😕

    And subscribing to a newsletter is one thing, but the current trend of adding subscribers to reading groups? C’mon now. Not here for that party. 😒

    Liked by 1 person

    • Felicia, the idea of a book preview is completely new to me. I agree they should be posted on the author’s blog, added into the end of a different book, or left for preview at the retail site. I had no idea this stuff was going on. And now I’m going to really show my ignorance….what to you mean by adding subscribers to a reading group? Sounds like another practice I know nothing about!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Normally a reader gets the free book for subscribing to newsletters. Check some of those Instafreebie pages…and lately some author blogs, and subscribing adds the reader to the author’s FACEBOOK READING GROUP. Yeah…that’s a thing now.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Teri, I definitely threw a hissy fit worthy of a ticked off feline!

      As irritating as the experience was, I never like to call out another author for a bad practice, which is why I’ll skip the review. But here on my blog I can bemoan the practice as wretchedly unfair!

      Liked by 1 person

    • It was actually a good read, but it hadn’t hooked me to the point of making me want to purchase the book after being gyped! I moved onto something else and the author has lost a potential fan. I wonder how many other readers have had a similar experience.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Hi Mae! KDP doesn’t allow authors to publish the entire book to Instafreebie during a group giveaway. Authors can only post a certain number of chapters to stay with KDP’s guidelines. Instafreebie, Amazon, and the giveaway sponsor are all aware of that. A responsible author should add information to the end of the “giveaway chapters” about when the book will be free on Amazon. That is what I did. Also, in my initial newsletter, I gave subscribers the dates that the book would be free on Amazon, and I placed those days near the end of the giveaway. I appreciate your honest opinion on how this marketing practice impacts the reader. It is something I will shy away from in the future.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Wow, Linda, you’re the first person who has explained why this happened. So if you’re a KDP author, you can’t offer a free ebook through Instafreebie? I admit the whole KDP realm confuses me. I have 2 novellas and 1 novel that I indie published, which I can set for free dates. Do you mean the author couldn’t plan a freebie at Amazon to coordinate with Instafreebie?

      I think I’m getting a headache thinking about this, LOL.

      Actually, your explanation shines a different light on the situation. In your case, you did everything you could to make your reader(s) aware of the situation. I think had I known going in that I was only getting a preview, I wouldn’t have been so miffed. But if I overlooked that fact, then other readers probably are too. It was the conception of “I’ve been had!” that irritated me more than anything else—that, and I wanted to keep reading.

      Thank you for explaining this. As a reader, preview promos don’t interest me. I’d rather have the reader promo the book (whether at cost or not) and purchase or download. Now that I know preview promos are “out there” I will be more careful in the future.

      Thank you again for clearing this up!

      Liked by 2 people

      • If an author is enrolled in KDP Select, she cannot offer the entire book on Instafreebie. She must disenroll from KDP Select, which she’s locked into for 90 days. Only then can she offer the entire book in other venues besides Amazon KDP. Still, I understand how upsetting it is to read only a sample—especially if you haven’t been warned.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Thank you again! I’m in KDP Select (I think) and know that I couldn’t market my books at other vendors, but I didn’t realize that included freebies. It makes sense now!

        Like

      • To answer your question, yes, an author can plan free days to coincide with giveaways, but you only get about 5 free days (I’ll check my facts) per 90 days. If the giveaway is 7 days or 14 days, you still run out of days before the giveaway is finished. Not excusing anything that leaves my readers irritated. Just shedding some light.😘

        Liked by 1 person

      • Your explanations have gone a long way in making me feel less “tricked.” I think the problem with this type of promo is that most readers probably aren’t aware of the reasoning behind the preview limit. I really appreciate everything you’ve shared.

        Liked by 1 person

      • And if they had the free days planned why would someone sign up for a newsletter for a free book when they could download it free on Amazon. However, I think even if it’s free you can’t put it on Instafreebie, but I’m not positive about that.

        Liked by 1 person

      • The whole free on Amazon vs Instafreebie has been an eye-opener for me, Kim. Apparently, you can’t offer it on Instafreebie, hence why many authors choose to do a preview. I have a feeling most readers are clueless about that and will end up feeling like I did!

        Liked by 1 person

    • I’m starting to think that if I was unaware of the practice then a lot of other readers probably had the same reaction I did. That can’t be good for the author. And thinking about KDP and the rules just gives me a headache, LOL.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I have run into this too and am TRYING my best to ignore all the instafreebie and book funnel emails, along with the mass giveaways. Even though I am retired, my time is important to me and there is never enough time in the day. I have unfollowed authors because of these issues. I spend hours a week on emails and newsletters and hate the feeling I have been tricked. The authors should tell us it’s only a preview, or the giveaways we are signing up for means we’ll get 25 (or whatever) new emails in our inbox. 😦 Not cool.
    sherry @ fundinmental

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ahh, so that’s the group reading list thing! Now I understand what Felicia meant. You offer an email because you’re interested in a single title and suddenly you’re on 30 mailing lists. I actually participated in something like that a year or so ago, but it was clearly stated what the person was signing up for. I did harvest a lot of email addresses through the event, but many ended up unsubscribing after a few months. I don’t think I would do it again.

      And I do agree that time (whether retired or not) is valuable. There does seem to be a glut of these types of promos out there right now. I wonder if it is starting to replace blog tours, which I see less of.

      And feeling tricked is exactly how I felt, Sherry!

      Liked by 2 people

  10. I would also have been annoyed. I have not participated in free giveaways as writer or reader – another technical challenge. What I have done is be happy to download a book being offfered free on Amazon with no strings attached, if it appeals to me. I always review all books I read, so the writer who offered it for free has attained their objective, especiallly if I buy another book by them. Probably by the time I get to read a book on my Kindle I forget whether I bought it for free, 99 pence or more.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s exactly how I feel too. I may take advantage of free download on Amazon–if the book interests me. I also review everything I read. As an example, I just finished a book that was offered as a free download. I loved it, gave it a 5-star review, and immediately bought another book by the same author. That’s how it should work.

      Thanks for dropping in to share your thoughts today!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Either that or make it EXTREMELY clear this is ONLY a preview!
    A group I’m in has released a series of freebies called Book Bites in which we donate a chapter from our books in the hopes of finding new readers. BUT, we specify in the blurb and on the cover that the reader is getting a variety of teasers, nothing more.
    It’s too bad the author chose this route, it leaves a bad taste and I’m sure you’ll remember her/his name and quite likely second-guess buying their books 😦

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacquie, the way your group is doing it is the way it should work. Even the title “Book Bites” makes me think I’m only getting a sample. Knowing that in advance would not leave me feeling cheated.

      I do know that I’ve made a few blunders over my years as an author, so although I do not think I will read this author again, there is a chance this was simply a blunder for them too. It’s been interesting getting everyone’s thoughts and comments here today. Thanks for sharing!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I have seen this. I ran a giveaway not long ago and some of the authors who entered their books entered previews rather than the whole book. However, they were marked as PREVIEW. I don’t get it, why would someone want to get a preview of a book that way when they can just go to Amazon and download a preview for free? I can usually see two sides to a coin though. The author’s book may have been a KDP SELECT and could only offer a preview of their book. I have learned to pay more attention too when downloading what I think is a free book.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Just read that Linda had already mentioned KDP. Sorry. Some of my books are in KDP and some aren’t. That said, I would never offer a preview as a giveaway. I only offer something that I know I would want. I wouldn’t want a preview. Some do especially if they only have one or two books published. It should be clearly marked as a preview if they do. If I see it’s a preview, I don’t download it. I have seen authors create a book of previews and sell them. Some authors sell serials which are put out like a TV series and sell each episode.I don’t purchase these either.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’ve seen the serial offerings and steer clear of them as well, Kim. I guess I’m Old School. Forget the previews, forget the serials, just give me a good book that will keep me coming back for more in the series, It’s the way I read, and also the way I write 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • I totally agree about someone being able to go to Amazon and download a preview, Kim. The Instafreebie was a longer preview but the idea still didn’t work for me. If authors band together and clearly mark their offering as a preview then readers would know that going in. In the case, I was either very lax or the promo wasn’t defined the way it should be. Personally–as. a voracious reader–I have no interest in a preview promo. I know what interests me and don’t need previews. Even when my favorite author team runs a preview of their upcoming book, I don’t read them. I already know I intend to pre-order and purchase.

      Liked by 2 people

      • That’s me too. I don’t even read the chapter for the next book in the back of the book I purchased. If I like the book I just read, I’ll purchase the next one. I don’t want to read a chapter, get hooked, and not know when I’ll be able to read the next one. I have accidentally downloaded previews too.

        Liked by 1 person

    • It was a rude awakening, Teagan. I’ve since learned there was a reason for it, but the sting is only slightly muted. As an author, if I didn’t know this stuff (preview promos) were going on, I’m guessing that most readers wouldn’t either. Hissy fit, indeed!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Okay, I’ve been reading everyone’s comments, and I think I understand that it’s the “Instafreebie” label/designation that means it’s only a preview. I’ve never signed up for anything like that, nor have I ever given much thought to buying them. I lean more toward individual books than sets by various authors, anyway, except for short story anthologies.

    Mae, I don’t do free giveaways anymore, because they weren’t working well for me. Nor were the countdown deals. So now, when I want to do a promo, I just lower the price of my book for X number of days, then raise it back up when the promo is over. So far, that’s worked well for me. But I’m not offering it free, so it’s a whole different thing.

    I’m glad to understand the concept of Instafreebie, though I suspect I won’t be downloading any of them. I don’t even read the free previews in the back of some books I’ve finished, though I include them in my own books for those who enjoy them. But personally, I hate knowing too much about a story before I get my hands on the book, other than whether it is a genre/author I like, and has it been getting good reviews. That’s enough for me.

    Very interesting post, Mae.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Marcia, thanks for sharing your thoughts here, I have three indie titles and I’ve run a few free promos. One paid off very well (on a novel) the others (on novellas) not so much.

      The idea of an Instafreebie as a preview doesn’t work for me either…kind of like a waste of time. If want a preview I can grab it on Amazon. No sense in offering up my email address and getting added to a list(s) to get it.

      I do skim the previews in the backs of books I purchase, except when its a “guaranteed buy.” As strange as that sounds, if the author is an automatic buy for me, I don’t want the preview. I’d rather experience the book a whole, Weird–maybe 🙂

      The whole concept of a preview as a “freebie” is foreign to me. I can walk into any brick and mortar store and preview all I want. Why should I have to give up my email address to do that online?

      Thanks for sharing in the conversation on this post. I’m glad you enjoyed it. I loved getting everyone’s take 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • I agree with pretty much everything you said here, Mae, except for reading those previews in the backs of purchased books I’ve finished. Especially if I just finished Book 1 in a series, and the preview is for Book 2. I already know whether I want to keep reading the series at that point, and if I do, I don’t want to see one thing in that preview. I just want to go straight to Amazon and get Book 2. 😀

        Of course, you can’t always go by me. I’m a fanatic about not accidentally learning what’s going to happen, either while I’m reading or in a lengthy review. I’ve been known to cover up the last page in a book as I’m reading the NEXT-to-last one, so I won’t even accidentally see how it ends. 😀 So, previews are pretty much out for me. And like you said, you can get a pretty good one on Amazon without having to offer up your email. I’ll read a little bit of that once in a while, if I’m on the border about whether I’ll like a writer’s style. I can usually tell by the end of the first page, so don’t have to go very far.

        Yep, a good, thought-provoking post, and one where I learned about something new. Instafreebies. Hmm. Didn’t even know that was a thing. Doh!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I had no clue either, Marcia, so I’ll own that “Doh” with you.

        And I’,m in complete agreement about the previews in the back of books. I probably didn’t explain very well, but only read them if they aren’t part of a series I’m already invested in. The Pendergast series of books by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child is a perfect example. They are an automatic buy for me, so I have no desire for a “sneak peek” of the next book. But if I’m reading a stand alone novel and the author offers a preview of an unrelated title, I will usually check that out. Sometimes I just skim, but other times I can been invested. The whole ideal of a group promo with previews, however, just doesn’t work for me.I wonder if the authors who participate see results.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. I’m with Marcia and Jacquie, and I’m glad Linda clarified things. Still, if it’s only a preview, it should be glaringly obvious before you download (my opinion, of course). I hear ya about feeling gyped, though. It’s too bad for the author–any author–because leaving a bad taste in a reader’s mouth allows word to get around about it. I like the idea of Marcia’s practice of limited-time discounts, and I’ve seen authors give away novellas instead of the book, sometimes novellas with the same characters. In any case, this is a great heads-up about KDP. Excellent comments/conversations as well!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, the free novellas that tie into full length works are wonderful. It’s a great way of introducing a reader to a series. I’ve even toyed with doing one on my Point Pleasant series. I’ve done a few limited-time discounts with Eclipse Lake in the past. They are another good promo tool as Marcia said (I should probably do one again). I learned a lot from the comments on this post and am glad so many people took the time to weigh in and share their thoughts. Thanks, Julie!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Love the cat photos! They get your feeling across great. I don’t ever enter to win free books unless it is through #RRBC. Like you, I have too many on Kindle already and long to get to all of the ones I have downloaded. Again, like you, I downloaded them because I WANT to read them. What the author did was wrong. He or She needed to specify that you would only be getting a preview and not allude to the whole book being free. Lots of good comments on this post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is sad that I actually WANTED to read this book and it turned out being a preview. I probably would have gotten around to buying the book eventually because it kept popping up on my radar. When I saw it offered as a free read it was a no-brainer decision. Now I’m turned off on the series. As an author, I know this is one thing I never want to participate in. Everyone has had such great comments on here. It’s been fantastic getting so many viewpoints and learning about processes along the way.

      And I’m glad you liked the cat photos. I had fun trolling my fave stock photography site for them! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Sounds like fraud to me, Mae. I gave up giving my books away 2 years ago. I don’t think the freebies are read for the most part. As well, I understand the giveaways are a marketing ploy, but I don’t believe any author should give away their work. But don’t pay me any mind – I’m the world’s worst marketer.

    Liked by 1 person

    • LOL! I think sometimes the freebies work and sometimes they backfire. I did a freebie once that netted me returns months after the fact. I’ve never been able to duplicate that same success with a freebie again, so maybe the planets were in alignment, LOL.

      And I have become a faithful fan of a few series after initially being hooked by a free read. Previews though…..nah. I don’t see benefit in them. and now I know to be on the lookout if I ever decide to download a free “book” again! 🙂

      Thanks for dropping by and sharing your thoughts, John!

      Liked by 1 person

  17. That is so not cool! I would never do that to a reader. That’s kind of like that time I bought a book (maybe .99?), and when I got about a third through it, it ended very unsatisfactorily…then the other two thirds of the book were ads for the author’s other books.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ugh! Lauralynn, the sounds absolutely awful about the book you bought. I would have been so ticked getting something like that—kind of like paying to read an ad. Like you said–not cool!

      Like

    • Ack! I could have sworn I answered this comment, Flossie. I think my computer must be holding me hostage now, LOL.

      It’s weird that the Paperwhite doesn’t let you order. I have a Fire too, but do most of my reading on the Paperwhite. Although, at that time, as irritated as I was, I probably wouldn’t have ordered the book anyway! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Marketing at all costs, huh? I’m sorry I came late to this one (WordPress settings that seem to alter themselves in the middle of the night). I absolutely agree – free books seem to me to be a bit of a river tributary to take for those titles that are on the remainder list, but a free book is a free book, not a craftily disguised preview. Sad to say, but I imagine the tactic probably worked – if it was a good book, that is…

    Liked by 1 person

    • It was a good book–at least it started that way–but I still haven’t gone back to it to purchase the whole volume. It’s been a learning experience that this appears to be a new trend among authors. Sad that it’s come to this and that authors constantly seem to be looking for a new way to hook fans. This one backfired, IMO.

      And, oh yeah, those twisty WP settings. They’ve left me baffled and bereft a time or two as well!

      Liked by 1 person

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