About Mae Clair

Writing tales of myth, mystery, and contemporary romantic suspense

Mythical Monday: Tommyknockers by Mae Clair

Ancient mining tools and basket full of rocks inside a tunnel in a mineStephen King made the name famous in his 1987 science-fiction novel. But people of the Old World, and those who worked in coal regions, knew about Tommyknockers long before then. Some believe them to be the spirits of departed miners, others insist they are sprite-like creatures who cast an eerie blue glow as they move through darkened mine shafts.

Whatever their nature, Tommyknockers dwell in the shadowy recesses below ground. Like many supernatural beings they can be helpful—digging industriously and assisting miners in locating ore—or harmful if not treated well. As a result, workers frequently left pans of water and food, occasionally even coins as gifts to these gnomish mine-dwellers. In the event of an impending cave-in, Tommyknockers alerted the miners by a repeated sharp rapping sound. They were even known to lead rescuers to injured workers or guide men clear of dark shafts seconds before collapse.

It is believed the Tommyknocker legend grew from the tales of Welsh immigrants who arrived to work the coal mines of Western Pennsylvania. After the California gold rush of 1848, the legend spread west.

Often simply called Knockers in Welsh and Cornish folklore, Tommyknockers were the equivalent of the Irish leprechaun or Scottish Brownie. Mischievous as well as helpful, they had a fondness for unattended tools. Thus most misplaced items or petty thefts were blamed on the creatures. Welsh mine workers believed so strongly in these fey spirits, they would not work in a mine until assured by the owners that Tommyknockers were already in residence.

As late as the mid-twentieth century, mine workers clung to the superstition. When a large mine was sealed in 1956, workers petitioned the owners to reopen it in order that the Tommyknockers could be set free and find a new mine. The owners complied.

Today, though many scoff at the idea there are Tommyknockers, others who live in the vicinity of mines insist they still see blue lights weaving among the dark passages, and hear the sound of industrious workers digging away.

Or perhaps steadily knocking . . .

Mythical Monday: The Phantom White Wolf of French Creek

When I think of folklore, there are several creatures particularly suited for the mystical and eerie trappings of legends. Owls, cats, crows, and wolves immediately spring to mind. For today’s Mythical Monday, I stumbled over a a fireside tale about a town in West Virginia that was plagued by a mysterious white wolf.

In the mid-1800s an albino wolf began attacking and slaughtering livestock in and around French Creek. The residents hadn’t seen a wolf in years, leading many to believe the creature must be supernatural—especially given its ghost-white appearance. Fear blossomed and spread quickly, fueled by growing rumors.

a white wolfOne local farmer who lost several sheep to the wolf,  claimed he’d shot the beast three times, but the bullets had no effect. (Hmm…perhaps he should have used silver). Later the same month, the wolf was shot at close range, but again bounded away without being harmed. In the meantime, farm animals and pets continued to fall prey to the animal’s nighttime raids.

One of the farmers who lost a cow was a man named Bill Williams. In earlier years, when wolves dominated the countryside, Bill had been renowned for his prowess as a hunter. He’d killed hundreds of wolves, the bounties he’d collected allowing him to retire a wealthy man. Eventually turning from the practice, he took up farming, vowing never to hunt the majestic creatures again.

But the slaughter of his cow drew him from retirement. The townspeople and other farmers were relieved when he said he’d find and kill the albino wolf, putting an end to its reign of terror. Loading his rifle, he headed for an area the wolf was known to haunt. He took a small lamb with him and tied the helpless animal to a stake. Then he sat back and waited for the wolf to arrive, certain he would have an easy kill.

But fate was not kind to Bill.

When he failed to return the next day, several townspeople hiked to the area they knew he’d staked out. They found Bill with his throat mangled, his head nearly ripped from his body. In direct counterpoint to the grisly scene, the lamb was unharmed, still tied to the stake. Even stranger, there were no signs of blood or paw prints anywhere in the vicinity.

People believed the white wolf had exacted vengeance on Bill for breaking his vow to never hunt its kind. Others said the creature was a demon, for surely only a demon could do something so heinous and leave no trace of its passing. But why spare something as innocent as the lamb if that was the case?

A wolf in silhouette howling at the moonIt is unclear whether the white wolf continued to haunt the people of French Creek after Bill’s death, but tales of white wolves still circulate in remote areas of West Virginia.

According to legend, the ghost-like creatures slip from the darkness on nights illuminated by a full moon. They are impossible to catch or kill, and will simply vanish if cornered . . . only to return again when the full moon rises.

It makes you think twice about walking through the woods alone!

Mae Clair Welcomes Guest Blogger Brooke Williams

I’m happy to turn my blog over today to author, Brooke Williams, who shares a post about writers and one book’s journey to publication:

Why I Write Anything I Write 

Guest blogger…Brooke Williams

I often tell people that to me, writing is like breathing. It is a necessary thing that I do because I have to in order to get through my day. I write because I am awake. I write because I am so inspired by an idea or thought that I simply can’t avoid it. It is something that I HAVE to write down.

The first time that happened to me…an itch to write that was so large I could no longer avoid it…”Someone Always Loved You” resulted.
Book cover for Someone Always Loved You by Brooke Williams depicting ambulance and a close-up of clasped hands

“Someone Always Loved You” is the first full-length novel I ever wrote. The idea came from my thoughts surrounding coma patients. My grandmother was in a coma on two separate occasions. As a child, I wondered if she could hear what was going on around her and what she might be thinking. When I grew up, I always wanted to write a book based around someone in a coma.

The basic idea festered in my head for many years and then, out of the blue, the scene for the prologue came to me. Without giving too much away, the scene included an ambulance driver who, on his very first day on the job, hits a pedestrian on her way into the hospital. That pedestrian is then thrown into a coma.

The novels stems from there and once I had the prologue written out, I really had no idea what would happen next. What DID happen next was as much a surprise to me as it is to the readers I have heard from who couldn’t believe the twists and turns the book takes.

People ask how I came up with this or that in the book…was any of it based on real life? The answer is yes and no. The book is a combination of things from my life as well as completely made up items. For example, there is a couple in the book that meets on the Internet. My husband and I met on the Internet. Some of the memories the character in a coma has are similar to things that happened to me. On the other side, there are characters that I have no connection with in the real world at all.

And that’s what makes fiction so great. It can be completely you and completely not you all at the same time. “Someone Always Loved You” is a book that is so close to my heart, I could never part with it. My husband eventually put it up on Amazon in kindle format and I went on to publish it in paperback, more for family and friends and fun than anything else.

But as the years went on and I began a real career in freelance writing and eventually as an author, I realized this book deserved to be read. It caught on a bit without my doing anything at all and people were buying it. I noticed when I started getting very small royalty payments from Amazon. Each month those payments rose and I was excited that people were enjoying the book.

My goal with this book is that those who read it enjoy it even half as much as I enjoyed writing it. If that happens, I am happy. I don’t expect it to pay my bills. I simply want it to do for others what it did for me.

“Someone Always Loved You” is a book that wrote itself using me as a vessel to get out! I am thankful for it in many ways. It showed me that I could write a full novel, which I have done numerous times since then. It showed me a range of emotions I didn’t know I had. And so much more.

BLURB:
His first day on the job, ambulance driver Jay has a horrible accident. The victim of the crash is thrown into a coma and Jay keeps vigil by her side. As their lives, past and present intertwine; a story of love through time unfolds. An intricate drama including adoption, love, suspense, and plenty of questions, Someone Always Loved You is a novel that keeps the mind churning and the soul alive.

Author Brooke WilliamsAUTHOR BIO:
Brooke Williams is a former radio announcer turned freelance writer and author. She has several books under contract including “Wrong Place, Right Time,” a romantic comedy due to be released December 9th; “Accept this Dandelion,” coming February 2015, and “Mamarazzi,” slated for release in August 2015. Brooke even has a children’s book on the horizon for February 2016. Brooke is the mother to two young girls, Kaelyn and Sadie, and she has been married to her husband Sean since 2002.

Connect with Brooke at the following haunts:
Facebook
Website
Email: Authorbrookewilliams@gmail.com

Purchase SOMEONE ALWAYS LOVED YOU from
Amazon 

Mythical Monday: Pennsylvania’s Hoodoo Train, Engine 1313 by Mae Clair

Before launching into today’s Mythical Monday post, I invite you to visit me at the blog of Kristi Rose where I’m sharing ECLIPSE LAKE and also news of my next two releases. Do hop over if you get a chance. You can find the post here. As for Mythical Monday, today’s topic isn’t about a beastie or mystical place, but a cursed train tucked into Pennsylvania history. As a “Keystoner” I’m always intrigued by legends related to my home state. Thus, I invite you to ride on the hoodoo . . .

Most people are a little freaky about the number thirteen. Even if you’re not superstitious, most are conscious of the ill omens associated with a number tied to bad luck. Given that connection, it’s surprising the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) had no qualms about rolling out Engine 1313 in 1888.

Many muttered no good would come of it, but the railroad wasn’t interested in superstition or idle gossip tied to ancient folklore. The engine went on the line with high aspirations, all quickly squelched when the train struck and killed two children during its maiden voyage. The engine was examined, found to be in perfect working order, and placed back on the track. It failed again when the train plunged off a railroad bridge killing twelve people including the train’s fireman and engineer. A month later, it collided with another train, resulting in the derailment of several cars and injuries to numerous passengers.

steam train with smoke exiting funnel rising up hill ** Note: Slight blurriness, best at smaller sizesPuzzled, inspectors thoroughly examined the engine but could find nothing wrong. Surely, the catastrophes couldn’t be tied to the assignment of an ill-fated number.

The train was placed back on the track, only to have its boiler blow as it laboriously chugged up a mountain. The train’s fireman was blown out of the car and badly injured. Once again the train was examined and once again, the engine passed inspection. Despite growing grumblings from railroad workers who whispered of bad tidings and ill omens, the train was returned to the line. For several months all went well, and the hoodoo taint of 1313 seemed a thing of the past. Then, when arriving at Manor Station, its brakes failed, causing it to ram another train. The fireman for Engine 1313 was injured in the accident just as many of his predecessors had been.

Officials at PRR pulled the train off the tracks and had their mechanics scour it for defects. Despite all the stories about brake failure, they couldn’t find anything wrong. The train was returned to operation, but it wasn’t long before catastrophe stuck. Engine 1313 failed to stop at a station when the engineer applied the brakes, resulting in the death of three people. PRR’s mechanics took the train to task but found nothing wrong.

Placed on the tracks yet again, 1313 was rolling through Sang Hollow when its oil can suddenly exploded, burning the fireman and engineer. The last straw for most of the workers, they beseeched PRR to pull the train from commission. The company finally complied. Whether or not PRR believed the jinx associated with Engine 1313, it was abundantly clear workers wanted nothing to do with Pennsylvania’s hoodoo train.

Which brings me to my question—how do you feel about the number thirteen?

I readily admit it’s one I don’t like, and I’m highly superstitious about it. By the same token, it’s my street address/house number, which doesn’t bother me at all. What a strange parallel. Could it be because one is mystical and the other mundane and common place? I’d love to hear your thoughts on hoodoo thirteen—and Pennsylvania’s Engine 1313. Please share!

Mae Clair Presents: Tammy Tate and The Spirit Path #timetravel #romance

I’m delighted to welcome a new author today. Tammy Tate has just released her debut novel, THE SPIRIT PATH, a time-travel romance. If you’ve followed my blog for a while, you know I tend to get hyper-jazzed over time travel novels. I absolutely LOVE the cover of this one. Stunning and gorgeous doesn’t begin to cover it. Be prepared to drool, but first let’s meet Tammy! 

Tammy, you’ve got an extremely cool bio and clearly have a diverse background—from Police Dispatcher, to Powder Puff racing and driving an 18-wheeler, you’ve no doubt got a plethora of ideas to use in novels. But let’s talk about your writing background. What initially got you penning stories and how long have you been at it? 

My love for writing actually started in high school with a story about a girl that ran away from home and it was clearly a ‘why you shouldn’t run away from home’ masterpiece! She stumbled across every dangerous situation you could imagine. My teacher at the time was so impressed he wanted to share it with an influential acquaintance. The problem was, I never finished it. For some reason as a senior I thought about football rallies, prom and graduation first. Go figure…

LOL! I remember being a bit “distracted” myself in high school. What attracts you most to your chosen genre?

I’m a romantic at heart. But I don’t stop there! I like to toss in a dash of humor and sprinkle it with action. I make my characters work for their roles in my books and the fun part is watching them spring to life right before my eyes. The hard part is getting it down fast enough as it pours out onto the keyboard. That’s when they make me work equally as hard to keep pace with them.

Book cover for The Spirit Path by Tammy Tate showing a couple in silhouette with a horse in the foregroundCharacters are definitely a demanding sort. Much like cats and women. ;-)  Without giving too much away, please share a bit about your favorite scene from THE SPIRIT PATH.

One of my favorite scenes has to be when Nicole and Flaming Arrow camp beside a lake with a beautiful waterfall and she removes her long sleeve shirt, exposing her cami. In modern day, it’s considered appropriate attire. But in 1812… it’s a brazen choice. She doesn’t realize the impact until she looks up to find him staring as though she just stripped completely naked. Her reaction is priceless…

I like the sound of that set-up! THE SPIRIT PATH is on my TBR list and I look forward to discovering more about it. Right now I’d like you to share a single sentence – - yes, only one! – - of dialogue or description you love.

His gaze latched onto the thin straps at her shoulders, down to the slight hint of cleavage of her well-rounded breasts, and then roamed lower to the bare skin just above her Wranglers.

And I wonder what Flaming Arrow’s reaction is going to be in THAT scene ;) This sounds like a fun and sexy read, Tammy. When you’re not writing what do you do to unwind?

That’s easy, I’m riding on the back of our Honda Goldwing with my husband on the front. We pick a direction and ride till noon, eat lunch and ride back. The world looks so much different on a motorcycle compared to viewing it from a car window. You see it, smell it… taste it in a whole new light.

I have a very close friend who loves motorcycle riding. She and her husband are both avid bike riders. I remember riding with my husband when we were younger and always enjoyed the experience, especially in the evening on back roads. You could feel the change in the air temperature when passing streams or dense woods, and the smells . . . just so lush and green.  

I’ll move onto pets now, because pets and writers naturally go together like peas in a pod. If you have pets, tell us about them and whether or not they shadow your writing time and space.

My heroine has a palomino horse and a rottweiller just like the palomino horse and rottweiller I owned when I lived in the country. I actually wrote a much smaller version of The Spirit Path during that time in my life for a journalism/short story class I was taking. The version you’re seeing today is an expanded piece of work. It’s also part one of a three part series. I’m excited to say my contract is for the series so the other two will follow.

That’s fantastic, Tammy! And palominos are just beautiful.  From the time I was a little girl, we had a saying in my family whenever anyone blew out the candles on a birthday cake:  “Wish for a pony!” Even today, we still say that. I think everyone wants a pony when they’re little. How wonderful that you had a horse—and a dog! I did have a few of those, LOL. 

What is your: 

Favorite season:  Summer

Favorite type of music:  Country

Favorite color: Pink

Favorite animal: Horse

Sunset picnic or night on the town: Sunset picnic

I would take a sunset picnic too. And my sister would love you. Her favorite color is pink and she’s a summer girl. :)  

Tammy, thanks for being my guest today. It was wonderful to have you visit and I wish you much success with THE SPIRIT PATH. I’m looking forward to reading it!  

You can connect with Tammy at the following haunts:
Blog

Twitter
Facebook
Goodreads 

Author Tammy TateAUTHOR BIO:
Tammy Tate was born and raised in Hollywood, Florida, lived in Las Vegas for 7 years and Texas for 18 with her husband of 34 years. Her secret to a long marriage?

It’s easy when you marry your best friend. When she’s not writing and breathing life into her characters, she enjoys reading, motorcycles and thinking up ideas for her next book. Among her favorite movies are romance, science fiction, fantasy, comedy and thrillers. Before writing, she was an Executive Secretary, a Computer Consultant/Technician, and a Communications Officer (Police Dispatcher).

She doesn’t mind a challenge which has allowed her to race a late-model in a women’s powder puff race, run barrels and poles in a play-day rodeo and drive an 18-wheeler. Somewhere in between, she and her husband raised 3 wonderful children.  

BLURB FOR THE SPIRIT PATH:
Nicole goes horseback riding, not knowing that the events of the day would forever change her life.

After she falls off her horse and hits her head she wakes up to unfamiliar surroundings only to find she has traveled back in time to the year 1812.

She swung into the saddle, took a deep breath and then mustered the strength to ask him a question that she had been putting off.

“What year is it?” She exhaled slowly, preparing herself for his response knowing that when she woke up this morning it was 1997.

Flaming Arrow started to ride off, and then turned his horse to face her. “It is 1812″  

PURCHASE THE SPIRIT PATH  FROM:
Amazon
Books To Go Now 

Mythical Monday: The Sea of Darkness by Mae Clair #Myth #Folklore

It’s Mythical Monday and that means it’s time to delve into the dusty archives of myth and folklore. Rather than focus on one of my favorite beasties today, I poked around in my treasure trove of mystical places and unearthed a spine-tingling tale of the sea. Perhaps it’s fitting that as I type this, a vivid crescent moon hangs outside my window, suspended against a coal black sky—the perfect companion to this frightening bit of nautical lore:

Old sailing ship on a misty seaTucked into the annals of seafaring legend is a place known as Mare Tenebrosum, the Sea of Darkness. An oceanic region that is said to glide across the surface of the water, some believe it may be the infamous Bermuda Triangle. Others that it follows the ocean currents, moving from place to place, thus it doesn’t appear on any charts. Into this watery domain of shadow, lost ships and seamen sail forever in perpetual night.

A ship can enter the domain of Mare Tenebrosum without its crew being aware they have crossed a boundary. It’s only when night falls that the spreading taint of the Sea of Darkness is felt. No matter how rough the waters previously, with the touch of night, the sea grows mysteriously calm. No light shines from above, the moon and stars obscured by a dense ebony cloud.

Into the blackness, the rigging of a ship glimmers briefly as if illuminated by ghost-light. Horrific cries echo on the air – the wails of men drowning, the boom of cannon fire, commands bellowed in multiple languages, voices jumbled one upon the other in confusion and panic. The screams of women and children rise and fall as if nearby vessels are sucked beneath the waves. It is a symphony of terror played over and over in the darkness as phantom ships loom then vanish into the cloak of night.

Old sailing ship at dawnIf the ship is fortunate enough to sail free of Mare Tenebrosum into the dawn, crew members are often left teetering on the brink of madness.Those who escape with their sanity intact, avoid talking of their time in the Sea of Darkness, wanting only to forget the evils which reside there.

Folklore like this makes you realize the romanticism of the sea can often be dark and deadly. Do you agree?

A Three Blog Visit by Mae Clair

Eclipse Lake WidgetI’m packing up today and traveling with ECLIPSE LAKE. Should you be out roaming about the blogosphere you can find me at the following haunts discussing the following topics:

Tera Shanley (A look at family dynamics, romance and mystery)
Christina McKnight (Book promo post)
You Gotta Read Reviews (How settings influence what we write)

I hope you’ll have a chance to ghost around a few and say hello! :)

Mythical Monday: Chasing the Chupacabra by Mae Clair

The chupacabra is a creature said to haunt South America, Puerto Rico, parts of Mexico and portions of Texas. Known for attacking livestock and draining its prey of blood, the chupacabra’s name in Spanish is translated as “goat-sucker.” A mythical creature, the chupacabra is also recognized as a crytpid—a creature that may exist but hasn’t been proven to exist. If you’ve followed my blog for some time, you know I enjoy reading about mythical beasts and those put under the microscope of cryptozoology. It’s interesting when those fields intersect, as in the case of the chupacabra.

This is not a guy I would want to cross while out for a stroll.  A heinous looking oddity, the chupacabra has alternately been described as a winged monkey, a hairless dog with a pronounced spinal ridge or quills on its back, and a rodent or a reptile with grayish-green skin. The beast exudes a ghastly odor, is endowed with sharp fangs, and a forked tongue. Some believe the chupacabra is a coyote infected with mange, others that it is a species brought from outer space, still others that it is the result of a government experiment gone haywire.

Naturally, something this ugly has to have glowing eyes. In the case of the chupacabra, they are malignant red, capable of hypnotizing its victim and freezing them in place while the creature drains the victim’s blood.

Old farmshouse with free walking chickens  in rural surroundingsThe first report of dead livestock occurred in 1995 in Puerto Rico when a farmer found eight of his sheep drained of blood, each with three puncture wounds to the chest. For this reason, some believe the chupacabra is related to the vampire bat. It’s also been known to hiss and screech when alarmed and make an odd sound when feeding (who would want to get that close?).

Throughout the years the chupacabra has been blamed for numerous bizarre deaths in the killing of goats, chickens, pigs and dogs. Though most common to Latin America and South America, it has been spotted as far north as Michigan and Maine and has even shown up in Russia. There are countless videos and websites devoted to the myth of the chupacabra. This infamous crytpid has also made appearances on Animal Planet, and the Discovery Channel. Despite all the debate and discussion about El Chupacabra—including various descriptions from eyewitnesses—its legend continues to grow confounding skeptics, cryptozoologists and the curious in general.

As the debate rages, perhaps it’s best to err on the side of caution. What do you think?

Friday, Solstice Island and Summer by Mae Clair

Solstice Island Final smallIt’s Friday and it’s summer. Are you in the solstice mood? I am!

Today I’m visiting with Calisa Rhose at her blog ranch, and dishing up the “Top Ten Reasons Why You Should Read SOLSTICE ISLAND,” my romantic adventure novella. I hope you’ll hop over and give it a look-see. I had fun drafting up the reasons–a few  might even surprise you.

Curious? You can find my amazing list of reasons here :)

In the meantime, I wish everyone a Happy Friday. The gateway to the weekend has arrived. Enjoy it!

Mae Clair’s Pen Pal: Meet Author Amber Daulton with Lightning over Bennett Ranch

An ink quill with feather penIt’s Thursday, and that means it’s time for another Pen Pal visit. Today’s guest is Amber Daulton with LIGHTNING OVER BENNETT RANCH. 

Before we get started don’t forget I’m hanging out with Lorraine Paton today with FIVE FUN FACTS about ECLIPSE LAKE. And the uber supportive Kitt Crescendo is giving Eclipse Lake  the spotlight treatment too!

Now it’s time to meet a lovely new Pen Pal!

Amber, are you a draft writer or someone who invests a lot of time editing and polishing as you write? Why does your method work best for you? 

I edit and polish as I write. If I don’t, I usually become confused and frustrated as to where the story is going. I tend to get a lot of ideas as I write and those ideas usually make more sense than what I originally plotted. I’m also a stickler for details. A scene has to be almost perfect before I move on.

Your method sounds much like mine. It makes the writing process longer, but editing is usually a breeze. My absolute favorite part of starting a new novel is coming up with character names. What is yours and how do you go about it?

Deciding on character names is actually my least favorite part of starting a new novel. The name has to fit with the character I see in my mind perfectly or I can’t use it. I’m very picky (especially with the heroine and hero) and I sometimes spend hours, if not days, just scouring through baby name books and websites for the best names.

What I love most is creating a new world or researching a real town and then twisting it enough to fictionalize it. Research, in my opinion, is more fun than writing at times. I love to learn about new places, cultures and people.  Although I’d rather travel to do hands-on research, in-depth reading is second best.

I agree with you on that. I’ve taken a trip to a specific town a few states away specifically for research. I’m using the location as the setting of an upcoming novel. Of course it’s not always possible to visit the locales we choose to use, so online research and reading is a Godsend! Which do you find easier to write— description or dialogue? 

Both are easy for me. Dialogue is more fun to write, however, because I love drama and emotion-based scenes. I love to put my characters through the ringer! When I find myself tearing up as I write, I know I’m on a roll. I feel more creative, though, when I write description because I love creating new worlds and scenery. I tend to go overboard with detail sometimes and it hurts to cut back and delete as I edit.

When I find myself balking over cutting something I love, I remember Stephen King’s quote “sometimes you have to kill your babies.” But it does hurt, doesn’t it?  And I love emotion-based scenes. Your style sounds wonderful!  

Which brings me to LIGHTNING OVER BENNETT RANCH. Can you share a few details?

Lightning over Bennett Ranch is book 2 of the Montana Ranch Collection published on June 9th, 2014 by Books to Go Now.  There are five individual novellas in the collection, all written by different authors, and are set in the small town of Willow Creek, Montana. Each story intertwines and shares characters from the other books to create a widespread world within a loving, close-knit community.

Lightning over Bennett Ranch

What a great concept. And, strange as it may seem, Montana has always been on my list of places to visit. So much history there! Switching things up a bit, as a reader, name a book that had a a profound effect on you.

I read my first romance books, ‘True Blue’ by Ingrid Weaver, when I was 12. It’s about an ex-convict hero and a schoolteacher heroine. After reading this book, I decided I wanted to write my own stories about two people finding adventure and falling in love. And so I did. I finished my first novel within six months and I’ve revised that book several times over the years (it’s currently not published).

I credit ‘True Blue’ with opening the door into modern romantic literature for me. Without it, I may not be writing today.

So you wrote your first novel at twelve? That’s fantastic—and equally fantastic that a single novel opened the door to a whole new world for you. When you’re creating worlds and characters, do you have pets who shadow your writing space? 

I have five cats and they always disrupt my writing time. They either lay on my lap (which I don’t mind until they pin one of my hands under their tummy), wrestle with and hiss at one another or meow for attention. I love them but they certainly are a handful!

LOL! I ADORE cats, but five definitely sounds like a handful. I can just imagine them camped out with you in your office, demanding attention as only felines can. And now for a few quick questions. What is your: 

Favorite season: Autumn

Favorite color: Purple

Favorite type of music: Hard Rock

Favorite ice cream flavor: Butter Pecan

Casual or dressy: Dressy

I think you’re the first person I’ve interviewed who answered “dressy” to the last question. YAY!  I do enjoy being casual, but I love dressing up, so it’s nice to meet a kindred soul. :) Thanks so much for visiting with me today, Amber. I wish you much success with LIGHTNING OVER BENNETT RANCH. 

If you’d like to know more about Amber Daulton, connect with her at the following haunts:
Blog
Twitter
Facebook
Goodreads
Books to Go Now
Amazon Author Page

Amber  (68)About Amber:
Writing is the fruit to happiness.

Amber Daulton lives her life by that one belief even though she normally isn’t so Zen.

Author of Forever Winter, A Hero’s Heart and Lightning over Bennett Ranch, she published her first book in 2012 and plans to publish countless more in the future. She lives in the beautiful foothills of North Carolina with her punk-rocker husband and their five crazy kitties. Writing takes up most of her time, aside from her day job in the retail industry. As a fan of contemporary, paranormal and historical novels alike, she can’t get enough of feisty heroines and alpha heroes. Her mind is a wonderland of romance and adventure, laughter and awesome ways of kicking a guy when he’s down. She probably wouldn’t be too sane without her computer and notebooks. After all, what’s a girl to do when there are people jabbering away in her head and it’s hard to shut them up? Write! Nothing else works.

Blurb for LIGHTNING OVER BENNETT RANCH:
Melody Bennett’s parents trampled on her teenage romance with a drifter ten years ago. He disappeared without a word of goodbyes on the night they had planned to run away together. Since then, she cast aside her foolish notions of happily ever after and worked hard alongside the hired help to care for the majestic horses on her family’s ranch. She refused to give love another chance and resigned to live her life alone.

Max Fortaine returned with a heart guarded by secrets and a sizable bank account that took blood, prayers and tears to fund. The cowboy disrupted Melody’s peaceful existence with stolen kisses and a promise for more. After a lifetime of running, mistakes and regrets, he vowed to reclaim the only woman he ever loved… if only her overprotective father didn’t stand in his way.

~ooOOoo~

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